What’s the Difference Between Air Cleaners & Air Purifiers?

Categories:
What’s the Difference Between Air Cleaners & Air Purifiers?

The terms ‘air cleaner’ and ‘air purifier’ are often used interchangeably, and from a functional standpoint each serves a similar purpose. But they rely on different filtering technologies to restore compromised indoor air quality.

Air cleaners and air purifiers come in two models, portable and whole-house. The former will filter the air in specific rooms, while the latter are installed directly inside HVAC systems and can help keep the air fresh and healthy throughout the home.

Air Cleaners

For the removal of dust particles and other types of non-organic contaminants, air cleaners come highly recommended.

What are air cleaners?

An air cleaner contains filters that remove a wide variety of airborne contaminants from indoor breathing spaces. Over time these filters will have to be cleaned and/or changed, but with regular maintenance they will do a superb job of providing you with ample quantities of breathable air.

How do air cleaners work?

Air cleaners are installed inside ductwork, where they can work their magic as heating and cooling systems continuously circulate air throughout the home. Each time air passes through the filters will capture and remove more contaminants, and as long as you change the air cleaner filters on schedule your appliance should deliver outstanding performance for years.

What do air cleaners filter?

The list of indoor contaminants removed by a well-functioning air cleaner may include:

  • Dust
  • Dirt
  • Pet dander
  • Mold spores
  • Pollen
  • Dust mites
  • Smoke
  • Fumes or gases from cleaning products

Whole-house air cleaners offer excellent protection for those who are prone to allergies, asthma attacks, and dry and itchy skin, eyes, throat and nasal passages.

Air Purifiers

People who are concerned about the ravages of living allergens would be wise to invest in an air purifier rather than an air cleaner.

What are air purifiers?

Air purifiers target airborne bacteria, mold, mildew, dust mites, fungus and viral agents for extinction. These purifiers can remove other contaminants as well, but they are specially designed to prevent ductwork and other areas of the home from being invaded and colonized by unwanted microorganisms.

How do air purifiers work?

Air purifiers rely on UV (ultraviolet) light to kill or deactivate microbial life. Installed on or near the HVAC air handler, whole-house UV air purifiers are highly effective at preventing mold, mildew or fungus outbreaks, and they can stop bacteria and viruses from contaminating the air you breathe and putting your family’s health at risk.

What do air purifiers filter?

Good-quality air purifiers do an amazing job of eliminating:

  • Mold
  • Bacteria
  • Mildew
  • Fungus
  • Dust mites
  • Viruses

Should You Buy an Air Cleaner or Air Purifier?

An air cleaner is an ideal choice for those who are most concerned about typical indoor air pollutants, which may come from inside the home or through open windows if you live in a polluted area.

Meanwhile, air purifiers are the best option for homeowners with ongoing mold problems, or whose families suffer from frequent viral infections. Moisture problems in the home are another good reason to choose air purifiers, since microorganisms tend to thrive in moist environments.

Regardless of whether you purchase an air cleaner or air purifier, you won’t get good results if you purchase cheap equipment, or choose cut-rate installation services. Whole-house air cleaners and air purifiers are definitely more effective than portable models, but if you live in an apartment portable appliances can still make an impact.

Indoor Air Quality is a Rheem Pro Partner Specialty

If you want to learn more about air purifiers and air cleaners, and about installation procedures for whole-house models, please contact Rheem Pro Partner today. We provide the very best solutions for indoor air quality restoration and maintenance throughout the Colorado and Wyoming area.

6 Common Causes of a Leaking Water Heater

Categories:
6 Common Causes of a Leaking Water Heater

A hot shower is one of life’s simple pleasures and one that most of us count on without giving it any thought. So when that shower turns unpleasant due to low water pressure or no hot water we want a simple fix. The problem is quite possibly a leaky water heater. Troubleshooting the exact cause starts with understanding the various causes of water heater leaks, and the first step is examining the tank to find the source.

Here are six common causes of a leaking water heater:

1. Drain valve

One common cause — and the easiest to fix — is a loose drain valve. A drain valve can loosen over time and create a slow leak. Simply tighten it with a wrench just until it is snug. Be careful not to over tighten it and don’t force it.

2. Air pressure

Pressure can build up in the tank. This forces water to leak out of the tank in order to relieve the pressure. This occurs most commonly when the water temperature is set too high. It can also happen if the pressure from the exterior water supply is too great, or if the temperature pressure relief valve is defective.

3. Age of the water heater

Water heaters typically last 8-10 years. As they near the end of their lifespan, corrosion becomes more evident and can result in a leak. If this the case, call your HVAC technician immediately to address the problem. Waiting too long puts you at risk for flooding and the damage and headaches that come with it.

4. Condensation

Condensation can occur on the outside of the water heater when cold water enters the tank and the outside air is hot. This can sometimes be mistaken for a leak, but it is normal and common. Simply wipe down the water heater.

5. Rust

Water heaters are often made of steel, which is mostly iron. An anode rod inside prevents the iron from rusting, but over time, the rod can wear out and fail. If that happens, the rust will eventually create a leak. Prior to that, however, you may notice your hot tap water develop a rusty brown color. Call your technician right away to replace the anode tube and prevent further damage.

6. Sediment build-up

Over time, the minerals that exist naturally in hard water can settle in the bottom of the water tank and create a layer thick enough to block access to the burner that heats the water. As a result, the burner runs longer to heat the water and the excess wear and tear leads to deterioration. This can cause a leak or, worst case, cause the water tank to burst. Prevent sediment build-up by flushing the tank once a year.

Rheem Pro Partner serves Colorado and Wyoming. Contact us today for all your heating and cooling needs.

7 Ways to Extend the Life of Your Air Conditioner

Categories:
7 Ways to Extend the Life of Your Air Conditioner

How many years your air conditioner will last depends a lot on how well you take care of it. With a little attention and maintenance, such as regularly changing the air filter and utilizing a programmable thermostat, you can maximize the life of your air conditioning unit. The simple steps listed below will save you money by lowering your energy costs and minimizing repairs as well as by delaying the need for a replacement.

To help extend the life of your air conditioning unit, here are a few things you can do:

1. Schedule regular maintenance

A trained HVAC technician is your first line of defense when it comes to protecting and maintaining your air conditioner. During a service visit before the start of each cooling season, the technician will thoroughly clean the unit and make repairs or adjustments as needed. Doing so will prevent costly repairs down the road, and keep your system running as efficiently as possible for as long as possible.

2. Change the air filter on a regular basis

The air filter keeps your air conditioner (and your home) clean by preventing dust and debris from building up inside and ensuring sufficient airflow. This prevents breakdowns and extends the life of your system. Filters also help your unit operate at maximum efficiency, so your energy bills stay as low as possible. Air filters do get dirty, however, and once that happens they can no longer do their job. Check the filter periodically to make sure it isn’t clogged and change it every 30-60 days as needed to keep your air conditioner running smoothly.

3. Keep the outdoor unit clean and clear of debris

While the air filter keeps the indoor unit clean, keeping the outdoor unit clean is equally important to prevent mechanical problems. The area directly around the unit should be free of any debris, such as leaves, that can get inside. Maintain sufficient clear space around the unit so it can intake and exhaust air properly.  Don’t plant shrubs too close, or stack things on or against the unit.

4. Invest in a programmable thermostat

A programmable thermostat makes it easy to adjust the temperature when you’re away or at night so that your air conditioner is not running when you don’t need it. With preprogrammed or custom settings, you can set it once to match your schedule to save energy, money and wear-and-tear on your air conditioner.

5. Insulate doors and windows

Air leaks that allow warm air in and let cool air escape make your air conditioner work harder than necessary to maintain a comfortable temperature in your home. This wastes energy, raises your energy bills and shortens the life of your system. Check the caulking and weatherstripping around doors and windows every year and repair or replace it as needed.

6. Install blinds and curtains

The sun coming through uncovered windows can quickly heat up your home and keep your air conditioner running. Insulated or even non-insulated blinds and curtains, particularly on windows that get direct sunlight, will help keep your home cool and give your air conditioner a break.

7. Allow air to circulate

Proper airflow is necessary for your air conditioner to work efficiently. Make sure air vents are clear and unobstructed to allow air to circulate freely throughout your home.

For help with all your air conditioning needs, contact Rheem Pro Partner in Colorado and Wyoming today!

What is the Difference Between Ductless vs. Ducted Air Conditioning Systems?

Categories:
What is the Difference Between Ductless vs. Ducted Air Conditioning Systems?

If you are building or remodeling a home, or simply want to add a cooling system to an existing home, you may be wondering about the various options and which one is best for your situation. Most people are familiar with central air conditioning (also called ducted air conditioning), but you may be less familiar with ductless air conditioning (also called a ductless mini-split system).

Here’s an overview of both types.

Ducted air conditioning unit (or central air conditioning)

As the name implies, a ducted air conditioning unit uses air ducts and vents to distribute the cooled air throughout the home and return air to the system. Typically the ducts are used for both cooling and heating your home. The main unit of the air conditioner is installed outside (although sometimes it is mounted on the roof or in the attic) so it doesn’t take up living space. It sits on a concrete pad and connects to the ducts and the HVAC system.

Ductless air conditioning unit (or ductless mini-split system)

Ductless systems use an air handler unit that is mounted on the wall or ceiling, rather than air ducts, to deliver cooled air. They are energy efficient because air is not lost traveling through ducts to each room. However, depending on the size of your home, you may need to install more than one. In this way, they can also be used to cool specific areas or even to supplement central air systems.

Which Type of Air Conditioner Is Right for Your Home?

When a ducted air conditioning unit may be the best option:

A ducted air conditioning unit may be preferable if you already have ducts in your home for a forced air heating system. In that case, installation is just a matter of hooking up the new air conditioner unit to the existing ducts, making it an affordable option that can be installed quickly.

Ducted systems are preferable if airflow is a concern, as they are designed to circulate air. Ducted systems are virtually invisible because the ducts are hidden behind walls and the unit is outside, so they are a good choice if aesthetics are a concern.

Ducted systems may be simpler and less expensive to maintain because there is only one unit.

When a ductless air conditioning unit may be the best option:

Ductless air conditioning units are much easier and less expensive to install in homes that don’t already have ducts since the units go right in the wall or ceiling. Ductwork is expensive and complicated to install because it involves running the ducts from room to room and cutting holes in walls, floors and ceilings. In some cases, there may not even be enough room to install ducts. A ductless unit may also be preferable if you are removing the ducts during a renovation, or if you are building an addition and don’t want to add ducts and upgrade your current HVAC system.

Rooms can be independently controlled with separate air handlers, saving energy and arguments over temperature control.

Start with a qualified installer

Whichever system you choose, proper design and installation is the key to having an air conditioner that functions properly, efficiently and lasts a long time. Hire a trained HVAC professional to design and install your system.

Still have questions? The experts at Rheem Pro Partner are happy to help. Contact us today! We proudly serve Colorado and Wyoming.

3 Signs Your Air Conditioner May Be on it’s Way Out

Categories:
3 Signs Your Air Conditioner May Be on it's Way Out

On a hot summer day, an air conditioner can be a true lifesaver, as long as it’s working properly. The main way to ensure that your system will keep you cool all summer long, and save money in the long run, is to schedule a professional tune-up at the start of the season. In addition, however, you can avoid an unpleasant surprise by taking a moment to understand the warning signs that your air conditioner may be failing and the steps you can take to prevent a breakdown before it happens.

Here are five signs of a potential problem with your air conditioner:

1. Increased energy bills

An air conditioner that works harder to achieve the proper temperature uses more energy. If your energy bills are increasing and your home takes longer to cool, this could indicate that your system is failing.

2. The air coming from the vents isn’t cold

The air blowing through the vents should be consistently cool. If you notice that it is no longer as cold as when your system was new, or, of course, if it’s not cold at all, have your system checked out by a professional. The problem could be a simple fix, or something more serious.

3. Weak airflow from your vents

Limited airflow could indicate an issue with the compressor. It may also mean that your air ducts are dirty. Dust and debris can build up in the ducts and prevent air from flowing properly. Leaks in the ducts also prevent the conditioned air from reaching your home’s living spaces. (Ask us about Aeroseal, a patented process that thoroughly and economically seals holes and cracks in air ducts.)

4. Strange noises coming from the AC unit

Air conditioners are designed to run quietly. Squealing, grinding or grating sounds are a clear indication of a malfunction. Have a technician check out any unusual noises as soon as possible. Correcting the problem early can prevent a costly breakdown later on.

5. Leakage around the air conditioning unit

Any leaks should be addressed immediately. Water pooling around the unit may be caused by a clogged or broken drain tube. The presence of water or moisture can lead to mold growth. Water dripping inside the unit may come from ice melting. If the drip pan is full, or you hear chunks of ice falling, call your HVAC technician right away. Either of these can cause significant damage to your air conditioner. A refrigerant leak also requires immediate attention. Refrigerant leaks pose serious health risks and can also indicate a major problem with your system.

Any of these signs warrant a service call. For increased peace of mind, however, be sure to schedule an annual tune-up by a licensed HVAC technician. Doing so will greatly diminish the likelihood of emergency repairs and will also extend the life of your air conditioner and save money on energy costs.

Contact Rheem Pro Partner today for all your air conditioning needs. We proudly serve homes throughout Colorado and Wyoming.

5 Reasons to Invest in Regular HVAC Maintenance

Categories:
5 Reasons to Invest in Regular HVAC Maintenance

When your HVAC system is running smoothly, scheduling maintenance appointments may be way down at the bottom of your to-do list. However, annual HVAC maintenance is the easiest and most economical way to ensure that your air conditioner and furnace work properly and safely all season long. Taking care of your equipment improves energy efficiency and prevents the inconvenience of breakdowns and costly emergency repairs. It also keeps your system from needing a replacement prematurely. Preventive maintenance is the best way to protect this significant investment in your home.

Here are the top five reasons you should invest in regular HVAC preventive maintenance:

1. Increases energy efficiency

An HVAC system that has to work harder to maintain the proper temperature uses more energy. Regular maintenance keeps your system running as efficiently as possible and that can translate into substantial energy cost savings over time.

2. Minimizes air conditioner and furnace repairs

A trained HVAC technician can catch small problems while they are easy and inexpensive to fix, and even prevent problems from arising in the first place. Maintenance appointments at the start of the season can be easily scheduled at your convenience. Regular maintenance prevents the need for emergency repairs, which are costly and inconvenient. During peak periods in winter and summer, any service call can be challenging to schedule as demand increases dramatically.

3. Lengthens the lifespan of your air conditioner and furnace

Normal wear-and-tear occurs over time as your furnace and air conditioner are used normally and can get worse as the equipment ages without proper care. Regular maintenance decreases that wear-and-tear, effectively prolonging the life of your system. This means more years of service before you need a replacement.

4. Improves indoor air quality

Indoor air pollution has become an increasing problem as our homes are sealed more tightly against the elements, trapping harmful or irritating substances such as dust, cigarette smoke and pet dander, inside. This is particularly troubling for people with allergies or respiratory illnesses. Regular HVAC maintenance keeps your system clean and ensures that the air circulating throughout your home is clean and well-filtered.

5. Ensures the safety of your home

A poorly maintained HVAC system can result in a carbon monoxide leak.  Preventive maintenance typically includes a carbon monoxide test which can detect a potential hazard before it becomes deadly.

Contact Rheem Pro Partner to schedule your summer maintenance today! Rheem Pro Partner serves homes throughout Colorado and Wyoming.

Air Conditioner Turns On and Off Frequently? Here are Some Things You Can Do

Categories:
Air Conditioner Turns On and Off Frequently? Here are Some Things You Can Do

If you notice your air conditioner turning on and off every few minutes, you should address it right away. This is known as short cycling. It wears out the compressor, one of the main components of the outside unit that is very expensive to repair or replace.

Short cycling can lead to other problems as well.

  • The repeated system start-ups use more energy and unnecessarily Increase energy costs.
  • The excessive wear-and-tear shortens the life-span of your air conditioner.
  • Over-worked equipment results in costly repairs.
  • High humidity or temperature swings mean decreased comfort.

What can cause an air conditioner to short cycle?

Dirty air filter

One common cause is a dirty air filter, which can inhibit airflow and cause a host of problems. Change the air filter every 30 to 60 days to keep your air conditioner equipment clean and running smoothly.

Dirty condenser coils

When the condenser unit and coils get dirty, they don’t work efficiently, making the whole system work harder and possibly overheat. This triggers the unit to shut off and restart repeatedly. Make sure the area around the unit is clear of debris such as leaves.

Improperly located thermostat

Locating a thermostat improperly can cause the thermostat to misread the actual temperature and turn on and off more than necessary. Make sure your thermostat is installed on an interior wall away from windows, doors to the outside, air vents and direct sunlight.

Frozen evaporator coil

Restricted airflow and low pressure throughout the system can result in ice or frost forming on the evaporator coil.

Oversized air conditioner

If short cycling has always been an issue, it is likely that your air conditioner is too big for your home. An oversized air conditioner will cool your home quickly but without properly dehumidifying the air. In addition to short cycling, this can lead to hot and cold spots, and the lack of efficiency will mean higher energy bills.

Low refrigerant / freon

Low levels of refrigerant may indicate that there is a leak. Any leak should be identified and repaired right away by your HVAC professional.

Because short cycling can be an indication of a serious problem, the sooner you address it the better in order to prevent or mitigate any potential damage.

Rheem Pro Partner is ready to help with all your air conditioning needs. Contact us today in Colorado and Wyoming with your concerns about short cycling, or any questions regarding your heating and cooling equipment.

How to Save Big with Rheem and Excel Energy Rebates

Categories:
How to Save Big with Rheem and Excel Energy Rebates

Modern furnaces and air conditioners can deliver enormous energy and money savings, and energy-efficiency rebates can cut their costs even further.

Thanks to the 2018 rebate programs available from Rheem and Xcel Energy, high-quality HVAC equipment has never been more affordable for Colorado homeowners.

The A-B-Cs of Energy-Efficiency Rebates

Xcel Energy is one of the largest electricity and natural gas utility companies in the country. In its efforts to embrace sustainability and environmental responsibility, Xcel Energy is offering substantial rebates to customers in Colorado who purchase and install energy-efficient air conditioners and/or gas furnaces in their homes.

Meanwhile, the HVAC company Rheem, a respected retailer that sells a wide range of energy-efficient appliances, including air conditioners and gas furnaces, is also offering rebates to encourage their customers to purchase superior-quality HVAC equipment that will save them money and reduce their energy consumption.

So what does all this mean to you, the Colorado homeowner? It means you could enjoy up to $2,725 in savings, if you purchase and install a Rheem high-efficiency gas furnace and central air conditioning system in 2018.

These are significant savings, and it doesn’t even factor in the money you’ll save on your utility bills if you take the energy-efficient plunge.

SEER, AFUE and You

To qualify for maximum Rheem and Xcel Energy rebates, you must purchase an air conditioner with a SEER rating of at least 17, and a gas furnace with an AFUE rating of 95 or better.

SEER stands for seasonal energy efficiency ratio, and it measures the relationship between cooling output and energy input. Any air conditioner with a SEER rating of at least 14 would be considered high-efficiency, and a unit with a 17 rating might offer double the efficiency of an older-model air conditioner purchased in the late 1990s.

AFUE stands for annual fuel utilization, and it is stated as the percentage of fuel used by a gas-burning appliance that is actually converted to heat. In comparison to a furnace with an AFUE rating of 80 (the lowest standard currently available), a gas furnace with an AFUE rating of 95 percent would cut energy waste (and energy costs) by at least 15 percent on an annual basis.

If they’re installed as replacements for outdated and outmoded equipment, a SEER 17 air conditioner and an AFUE 95 gas furnace could save you several hundred dollars on your utility bills over the course of a single year. Normally, the high cost of this superior equipment might offset a decent portion of these savings, but rebates are designed to compensate for this difference and make energy-efficient HVAC equipment more practical and affordable for everyone.

Getting Your Rebates

To qualify for Xcel Energy rebates, you must be an Xcel Energy customer living in the state of Colorado, in regions specifically served by this company (Xcel Energy does not serve Wyoming). You must also purchase equipment and installation services from a contractor officially registered by Xcel, and you must meet any and all deadlines associated with the rebate program.

Rheem rebates come directly from the manufacturer, and you must purchase their equipment from a licensed Rheem dealer to receive this financial assistance. Residents of both Colorado and Wyoming are eligible for Rheem rebates, as are residents of every other state.

Saving Money on Energy with Rheem Pro Partners

Rheem Pro Partners in Colorado and Wyoming is a rebate-friendly company, and if you do business with us we’ll handle all the paperwork to make sure you get the benefits you deserve. Our special Xcel Energy and Rheem rebate offer expires on May 31st, 2018, so if you’re in the market for a new furnace and/or air conditioner please contact us today, to learn more about our products and to find out how you can qualify for these exciting rebate programs.

Allergies? An Air Conditioner Tune-up Can Help.

Categories:
Allergies? An Air Conditioner Tune-up Can Help.

More than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, which can affect respiratory function and cause rashes, hives, or excessively dry and itchy eyes or skin. In some instances allergy outbreaks may require medical attention, and even in the best of situations they can cause a great deal of discomfort.

Indoor air pollution is a common trigger of allergy symptoms, which is not surprising since most homes contains a higher density of airborne pollutants than the average city street.

If you or your family suffer from allergies, something as simple as an annual air conditioner tune-up can dramatically reduce your susceptibility to outbreaks. And you can help reduce the risk even further by practicing a little preventive maintenance yourself.

The Shocking Truth about Airborne Allergens in Your Home

Inside the walls of your home, a veritable stew of nasty airborne pollutants may be circulating from one living area to the next at this very moment, wrecking their invisible vengeance on your beleaguered immune system.

Some common indoor pollutants include:

  • Pollen
  • Mold and mold spores
  • Pet dander
  • Synthetic carpet fibers
  • Insect droppings
  • Dust mites
  • Chemical traces from building materials
  • Volatile organic compounds from cleaning and personal care products

These allergens can accumulate inside ductwork, and when furnaces and air conditioners are turned on they can be distributed far and wide to all the rooms you inhabit.

If furnaces and air conditioners get dirty and wet they may contribute directly to this mixture of toxic contaminants, and that is one good reason why air conditioners must be tuned-up and maintained on a regular basis.

The A-B-Cs of Air Conditioner Maintenance

Before the cooling season arrives, the following steps should be taken to ensure your air conditioner is clean and in good working order and will not make your allergy problems worse:

  • Change your air filter. HVAC air filters should always be changed before you use your air conditioner for the first time. For maximum allergy protection and filtering effectiveness, choose a good-quality filter with a MERV rating of between 11 and 17 (anything higher will put too much strain on your AC and cause your utility bills to rise).
  • Clean the vents. Dust, dirt, and grime collect in abundance on the outside and inside of intake and outflow vents, and they should be thoroughly cleaned every two weeks to prevent these contaminants from recirculating when your AC is switched on.
  • Clean the areas of the air conditioner you can access. Each spring, you should clean your air conditioner’s condenser unit (the part of the AC that sits outside) as thoroughly as you can, to prevent the dust and dirt from getting sucked into the system when the air conditioner is turned on. You should also wipe away moisture anywhere you can find it, since moisture anywhere in the system can promote mold growth.
  • Contact your HVAC contractor to arrange a maintenance visit and inspection. This is the most important step in your AC maintenance plan. A trained HVAC technician will examine your entire HVAC system, including the inside and outside of the condenser, to check for dirt and moisture accumulation and any signs of damage. The technician will also inspect your ductwork from one end to the other, and then let you know if it needs to be cleaned or repaired.

Air Conditioner Tune-ups and More from Rheem Pro Partners

In Colorado and Wyoming, Rheem Pro Partners has an unrivaled reputation for quality performance and superior customer service. Contact us today to schedule an appointment for an air conditioner tune-up and maintenance inspection, and within days we will dispatch a technician to your home to check your HVAC system from top to bottom. Cooling season will be here soon, so don’t delay another moment.

What to Do Before Turning on Your Air Conditioner for the First Time this Summer

Categories:
What to Do Before Turning on Your Air Conditioner for the First Time this Summer

When summer comes, your air conditioner is a vital asset in your fight to stay cool, calm and collected.

But you should never take the health of your air conditioner for granted. Before the hot weather season officially arrives, here are a few steps you should take to guarantee your air conditioner will be ready to run at full efficiency when you need it …

Outside the Home: Preparing the Condenser

  • If you used a cover on your outdoor condenser unit to protect it from the snow over the winter, remove it before you start the air conditioner.
  • If no cover was used, clean off any and all debris that may have fallen onto the condenser. Next, remove the grill over the fan to check for any debris that may have fallen inside the unit.
  • With a soft brush attachment, vacuum the blades of the fan before reinstalling the grill, and vacuum out the bottom of the condenser box as well. If the blades are covered with grease or grime, you can use a soapy solution and a rag to wipe them off.
  • Remove the side and top panels on the condenser to access the condenser coils. Clean them thoroughly with a soft brush, or wash them off with a hose, or wipe them clean with a special condenser cleaning fluid that can be obtained from any HVAC dealer or home improvement store.
  • Make sure the area around the condenser is clear of all objects or vining plants, within a distance of at least three feet on all sides. When the AC is in operation air should flow freely all around the perimeter of the condenser.
  • If there is a power switch on the condenser, turn it to the ‘on’ position (you should also check the circuit breaker to make sure the power is on there).

Inside the Home: The Filter, Vents and Thermostat

  • Switch the thermostat manually from ‘heat’ to ‘cool.’ If you have a smart thermostat, reprogram it to reflect the coming changes of season. Check the battery on the thermostat to makes sure it is still working, or simply change it if you have not done so within the previous 6-9 months.
  • Clean the dust off the vents in each room throughout the house. If you can see dust has collected inside the vents in the ductwork, vacuum it out with a soft brush attachment.
  • Replace the HVAC air filter. Even if the filter doesn’t look overly dirty, it is always a good idea to get a new filter at the beginning of each heating or cooling season. In general filters should be changed every three months, so that schedule can be coordinated to make sure you install a new one at these important times. While you don’t have to buy the most expensive filters on the market, DO NOT use cheap fiberglass filters. They will rapidly become dirty and will not work particularly well even when they’re new.

Bonus Tip: Schedule a tune-up and maintenance inspection with your HVAC contractor

Home maintenance is important, but there are certain matters you should leave to the professionals.

A trained HVAC professional can inspect your coolant lines for leaks, replenish your supply of coolant if it is low, check your electrical connections and inspect your ductwork to see if it needs to be cleaned or repaired. After these tests are completed, they will turn the system on to make sure everything is top working order.

Seeking the Best HVAC Maintenance Services? Call Rheem Pro Partners Today

At Rheem Pro Partners, our technicians are constantly on-the-go throughout the spring and early summer months, offering expert AC tune-up and maintenance inspection services to our grateful customers in Colorado and Wyoming. To beat the summer rush, please contact us today to schedule your inspection—the health of your air conditioner could depend on it.